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Recommended destinations in Maremma

Here is a short selection of villages and places and other recommended destinations in Maremma. From Scansano to Pitigliano, from Ghiaccio Forte to the Maremma Regional Park. Of course there are many more, such as Sovana, Sorano, Pereta and all the other little villages perched on top of the hills around Scansano.

Scansano

Una vista del paese di Scansano, patria del Morellino

A view of Scansano, the capital of Morellino

The village of Scansano is the heart of the production of Morellino di Scansano Docg. Its origins go back to the Middle ages and over time it became increasingly popular especially during the 19th century when public offices moved here from Grosseto, during the summer. Among the most interesting buildings, the Archeological and viticulture museum, located inside the 15th century Palazzo Pretorio, is worth mentioning, together with Teatro Castagnoli, a beautiful 200-seat theatre built in the 19th century.

Ghiaccio Forte

This archaeological site dates back to Etruscan times when this used to be a fortified construction on top of a hill. Today only some ruins remain and together with the findings that are to be found inside the museum in Scansano (such as pots and other kitchen utensils) indicate that inside this small fortress there was a larger house for the lord of the fortress plus a couple a smaller dwellings  and a large area in which local farmers and their families and animals could hide in case of danger (that is to say the Romans). Many findings demonstrate that wine production was already undertaken at the time and in fact there are researchers trying to recreate a vineyard from the vines of vitis silvestra found locally, which might in fact come straight from the original Etruscan vines.

Pitigliano

Pitigliano

Pitigliano

Pitigliano is a beautiful village perched on a rocky hill, carved, in fact, into the limestone, with its houses protruding from the limestone spur. It’s history goes back to the Middle Ages and it has been often called the Little Jerusalem, thanks to the historical presence of the local Jewish community (see, for instance, the 16th century synagogue which can be visited daily except on Saturdays and the ghetto in general). For a long time it was a feud belonging to the Orsini family – with their palace and fortress. Among the other beauties that need to be seen, are the Vie Cave, the roads surrounding the village which were carved into the limestone, sometimes as deep as 20 metres.

Magliano in Toscana

Magliano in Toscana is perhaps one of the most beautiful examples of fortified cities in the area. The walls that surround it – and the various entrances to the town – were built in two different periods: a first part in the Middle Ages, when Magliano belonged to the Aldobrandeschi family, the second part later, under the Republic of Siena. Every summer Magliano hosts an international festival called Vox Mundi, with artists coming from all over the world.

Saturnia

is famous for its thermal waters which, thanks to their high content of sulphur and various minerals, which exit at a temperature of 37°C, have therapeutic properties that were already known to the Romans. It was them, in fact, who first founded the city of Saturnia – now a hamlet of Manciano – close to Via Claudia, on top of a hill in the inland area of Maremma, in this area close to the ancient volcano of Mount Amiata. The thermal area is in part freely accessible, but there’s also a luxury spa for those interested.

Parco Naturale della Maremma

Maremma, as already mentioned in the other pages, is a land full of nature, and only a couple of years before Morellino di Scansano was acknowledged as a Doc, the Maremma Natural Park was also created. Here, according to the season, you can see wild boars, deer, wild geese, pink flamingos, herons and other migrating birds though in fact the species to be found are countless. You can also see the famous butteri, the cowboys of Maremma.

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